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The motif Prayer in HCA : The Galoshes of Fortune (1838)
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The motif Prayer in HCA : The Galoshes of Fortune (1838)

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Religious motifs : Overview. Search. About religious motifs

The motif Prayer is a part of: Ritual

Keywords:

Faith, speech, words, ritual

Description of this motif:

Prayers in a religious sense of the word, are adressed to one or more gods, divine or sacred persons in anticipation of help, blessings or a good relationship.

There are prescribed prayers, e.g. the Lord's Prayer and Ave Maria, and there are prayers, which are spontaneous and individual. Both kinds are present in Andersen's tales.

Example 1:

If only I were rich; I often said in prayer When I was but a tiny lad without much care If only I were rich, a soldier I would be With uniform and sword, most handsomely; At last an officer I was, my wish I got But to be rich was not my lot; But You, oh Lord, would always help.

I sat one eve, so happy, young and proud; A darling child of seven kissed my mouth For I was rich with fairy tales, you see With money I was poor as poor can be, But she was fond of tales I told That made me rich, but - alas - not with gold; But You, oh Lord, You know!

If only I were rich, is still my heavenly prayer. My little girl of seven is now a lady fair; She is so sweet, so clever and so good; My heart's fair tale she never understood. If only, as of yore, she still for me would care, But I am poor and silent; I confess I do not dare. It is Your will, oh Lord!

If only I were rich, in peace and comfort rest, I would my sorrow to this paper never trust. You, whom I love, if still you understand then read this poem from my youth's far land, Though best it be you never know my pain. I am still poor, my future dark and vain, But may, O Lord, You bless her!

Example 2:

He quickly passed on to another woman's heart, which seemed like a great holy cathedral. Over the high altar fluttered the white dove of innocence, and the interne would have gone down on his knees except that he had to hurry on to the next heart. However, he still heard the organ roll. And he felt that it had made a new and better man of him-a man not too unworthy to enter the next sanctuary. This was a poor garret where a mother lay ill, but through the windows the sun shone, warm and bright. Lovely roses bloomed in the little wooden flower box on the roof, and two bluebirds sang of happy childhood, while the sick woman prayed for a blessing on her daughter.

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