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The motif Whitsuntide in HCA : What Old Johanne Told (1872)
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The motif Whitsuntide in HCA : What Old Johanne Told (1872)

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Religious motifs : Overview. Search. About religious motifs

See also The Holy Spirit

Keywords:

Feast, Christianity, Holy Spirit

Description of this motif:

Whitsun(tide) falls at the the 50. day efter påske. Greek pentakostê means "50th day". In the ancient Israel Whitsun related to the wheat harvest, in Judaism its core became the momory of the giving of the commandments on Sinai. For the christians whitsun is the setting around the celebration of the Holy Spirit, which was given the apostles. Whitsun became, aside with Christmas and Easter, the third great Christian feast.

The Holy Spirit enabled the apostles to speak other languages, so that they could kunne spread Christianity as a universal message. Whitsun thus marks the beginning of Christian mission and the birthday feast of the church

Source: Gads Religionsleksikon, 1999.

Example 1:

"The words you heard over there, little Rasmus, were not your father's; it was the evil one who was passing through the room and took your father's voice. Say your Lord's Prayer. We'll both say it." She folded the child's hands. "Now I am happy again," she said. "Have faith in yourself and in our Lord."

The year of mourning came to and end. The widow lady dressed in half mourning, but she had whole happiness in her heart. It was rumored that she had a suitor and was already thinking of marriage. Maren knew something about it, and the pastor knew a little more.

On Palm Sunday, after the sermon, the banns of marriage for the widow lady and her betrothed were to be published. He was a wood carver or a sculptor; just what the name of his profession was, people did not know; at that time not many had heard of Thorvaldsen and his art. The future master of the manor was not a nobleman, but still he was a very stately man. His was one profession that people did not understand, they said; he cut out images, was clever in his work and young and handsome. "What good will it do?" said Tailor Ölse.

On Palm Sunday the banns were read from the pulpit; then followed a psalm and Communion. The tailor, his wife, and little Rasmus were in church; the parents received Communion, while Rasmus sat in the pew, for he was not yet confirmed.

Example 2:

It was a beautiful Whitsunday morning. The church was decorated with green birch branches; there was a scent of the woods within it, and the sun shone on the church pews. The large altar candles were lighted, and Communion was being held. Johanne was among the kneeling, but Rasmus was not among them. That very morning the Lord had called him.

In God are grace and mercy.

Many years have since passed. The tailor's house still stands there, but no one lives in it. It might fall the first stormy night. The ditch is overgrown with bulrush and buck bean. The wind whistles in the old tree; it is as if one were hearing a song; the wind sings it; the tree tells it. If you do not understand it, ask old Johanne in the poorhouse.

She still lives there; she sings her psalm, the one she read for Rasmus. She thinks of him, prays to our Lord for him – she, the faithful soul. She can tell of bygone times, of memories that whistle in the old willow tree.

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